the body as a site
Jay Carlon
Thursday, Jul 11 2019
10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Cost
Earlybird Discount through June 30: $75 for 5 days // Starting July 1: $90 for 5 days or $20 Daily Drop-in

This 5 day workshop is an interrogation of the internal and external body, exploring the histories and traumas of the human form and body and space.

 

 

 

 

Inspired by his investment in site-specific work, identity, and his background as a childhood competitive wrestler, Jay will guide participants through a series of explorations using text, sensory attunement, and partnering skills.

 

 

 

 

This workshop will culminate in a performance and open jam on Saturday, July 13, at 7pm.

 

 

 

 

 

RSVP/contact: jay.carlon@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

Jay Carlon is a contemporary choreographer based in Los Angeles whose highly physical work is focused in experimental, site-sensitive dance theatre. Born and raised in Santa Barbara County, Carlon’s work inspired by his background as a competitive wrestler while growing up the youngest of 12 in a Filipino, Catholic, and agricultural migrant-working family. In 2016, he started a multidisciplinary dance group called CARLON. Jay’s work has been presented in Los Angeles at REDCAT, The Broad Museum, Los Angeles Dance Project, Annenberg Community Beach House, LA Dance Festival, Electric Lodge, Los Angeles Performance Practice, homeLA, and Beach Dances; in New York at 92ndY and The CURRENT SESSIONS; in Phoenix at Breaking Ground Festival; and in Monterrey, Mexico at Espacio Expectante. Jay is a performer and directing associate with aerial spectacle theatre company Australia’s Sway Pole, where he has performed at the 2014 Olympics, the 2016 World EXPO, and the 2018 Super Bowl. Carlon has also performed with the Metropolitan Opera at Lincoln Center, Palissimo, Oguri, No)one. Art House, and danced for Rodrigo y Gabriela on Jimmy Kimmel Live (choreographed by Annie-B Parson) and in Solange Knowles’ art film Metronia (2018) choreographed by Gerard & Kelly.

Upcoming Events in the Series:


Photo Credit: Jonathan Potter
Photo Credit: Charlotte Marchal
Photo Credit: Derek Rath